Architecture | The Benefit & Beauty of Adaptive Re-Use

Architecture | The Benefit & Beauty of Adaptive Re-Use

Preservation is an issue I've become more interested in since moving to Dallas a few years ago. I've even taken the step of joining Preservation Dallas (though full disclosure, I have not yet made it to any meetings, as they're always during working hours). Living in New York for four years proved to me that rehabilitating old buildings quite often results in more creative, interesting, and substantial structures than those that are new builds. Two primary examples that come to mind are the High Line, a retrofitted above-ground park that was converted from old train tracks, no longer in use, as well as Chelsea Market, which was the original Nabisco factory and has since been made into an area for restaurants and shopping. It's not that I think all buildings are worth saving, but there are many that definitely are that are not being advocated for. In many of these cases, preservation is what's best for the long term and makes the neighborhood itself more attractive for vendors and visitors. Below are some inspiring examples of this kind of 'adaptive re-use' that I would love to start seeing more of here in Dallas.

 I love that all the stores in Georgetown are converted from old town homes.

I love that all the stores in Georgetown are converted from old town homes.

 An old auto-part warehouse is re-imagined as a private residence.

An old auto-part warehouse is re-imagined as a private residence.

 A coffee shop from a converted church.

A coffee shop from a converted church.

Adaptive_Reuse_Churches_08.jpg
 Even the d'Orsay in Paris is converted from an old train station.

Even the d'Orsay in Paris is converted from an old train station.

Design Psychology | How Does it Feel?

Design Psychology | How Does it Feel?

All of the Lights | Sconces

All of the Lights | Sconces