Interior Design Master Class | Restraint

Interior Design Master Class | Restraint

Today, in my continued love of the new design book, Interior Design Master Class, I read an essay on restraint by designer Steven Volpe. Restraint and the act of editing is so important in interior design. Contrary to what you might think, even designers whose styles are exuberant, colorful, and layered, still have to consider these principles in their design, perhaps even more so. When all the elements in a space are loud, statement pieces, they must be the absolute perfect puzzle piece that fits within the interior, not one that's just 'good enough.' On the subject Volpe writes, "Intelligence about quality is essential to a design process steeped in restraint. So is a keen sense of value." If you want a sophisticated, pared-down interior, those pieces need to be strong enough to stand on their own. If these pieces don't have clutter or layers to hide behind, their quality will not lie. This is a good thing though! It's great to have that level of intention with each individual piece within the home. When everything is carefully considered and weighed based on its intrinsic value, the end result will come together as far more than the sum of its parts. 

Below are some restrained interiors with high quality pieces that most certainly 'work.'

 A dining room by Volpe that shows just how much he practices what he preaches.

A dining room by Volpe that shows just how much he practices what he preaches.

 Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt is one of the masters of restraint. 

Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt is one of the masters of restraint. 

 As is Annabelle Selldorf.

As is Annabelle Selldorf.

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Interior Design Master Class | Inspiration

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