The Architecture of Happiness | Order & Complexity

The Architecture of Happiness | Order & Complexity

In his book The Architecture of Happiness, Alain de Botton surmises that what attracts us to architecture is the notion that humans are able to conquer nature in such a tangible and identifiable way. The angles, materials, planning, and workmanship all come together, somewhat miraculously, to beat nature at its own game. Nature represents chaos; Architecture represents order. At first it seems as though de Botton is making an argument for boring buildings, that when buildings try to be too inventive or unique, they lose the very order that makes them appealing. "Architecture should have the confidence and the kindness to be a little boring," he writes. He is quick to note, however, not too boring. If a building is too orderly, we are not prone to awe at its construction. The sweet spot of objectively impressive buildings (defining this is essentially de Botton's objective in writing the book) "lies between the extremities of order and complexity."

Of course, any point the author makes about architecture can be directly related to interiors as well. I agree with him wholeheartedly on this manner- what makes a great space is an orderly interior that has chaos shining through. 

*cover image

Before & After | Wesley Moon

Before & After | Wesley Moon

Designer Profile | Kara Mann

Designer Profile | Kara Mann