Color Theory | Drunk Tank Pink

Color Theory | Drunk Tank Pink

I have not yet read Tristan Morris' 2013 book Drunk Tank Pink, but it's on my list. The book takes its name from a series of scientific studies conducted by Alexander Schauss in the late 1970s testing how color affects one's hormonal and emotional state. Participants in the study had their normal strength levels tested, stared at 18 x 24 inch sample of a particular color, and then had their strength levels tested again for comparison. Schauss found that one particular color had the strongest effect, the color he called P-618, but what later became known as "Baker-Miller Pink" and then, more recently, "Drunk Tank Pink." When candidates stared at P-618, Schauss participants showed "a marked effect on lowering the heart rate, pulse and respiration as compared to other colors." To further the experiment, a few prisons painted their 'drunk tanks' in this color to see the effect it had. Sure enough, violent incidences and aggressive behaviors dropped dramatically. There are even stories of football teams painting the opposing teams locker rooms in this color so that they are weaker, more feeble opponents on the field.

I'd be very curious to know what other colors Schauss conducted studies with. Particularly - were there other shades of pink? Drunk Tank Pink is very much akin to a Pepto-Bismol hue. It's not one I think you'd see in a residence or even commercial space any time soon. However, if other shades of pink were shown to have these properties, it could have a significant influence on interiors. After all, blush shades continue to be extremely popular these days.

I'm pretty sure Luis Barragán's pink wall at San Cristobal Stables would have an instantly calming effect on just about anyone.

I'm pretty sure Luis Barragán's pink wall at San Cristobal Stables would have an instantly calming effect on just about anyone.

Candles | I hate to be the one to tell you this, but...

Candles | I hate to be the one to tell you this, but...

Commercial Design | Residential Influence

Commercial Design | Residential Influence